Contact Lens Consultation

Contact Lens Solution For Progressing Myopia

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics 2015 survey, one in four Australians is myopic. This number is expected to climb 55% more come 2050. In younger Aussies, nearsightedness is the second most reported long-term condition, following allergic rhinitis or hay fever. (source:
https://www.aihw.gov.au/getmedia/9844cefb-7745-4dd8-9ee2-f4d1c3d6a727/19787-AH16.pdf.aspx
).

Myopia can start and progress in early adulthood. However, the most significant risk involves young children, especially during the age bracket between 6 to 12 years old, when high levels of shortsightedness are most likely to develop, where a viable solution is contact lenses.

Unfortunately, there is still no myopia treatment that can effectively cure nearsightedness. But the good news is that it can be controlled or managed.

Kids Consultation

Kids

Teenagers And Adults Consultation

Teenagers And Adults

Older Individuals Consultation

Older Individuals

Athlethes Consultation

Athlethes

Comlicated Prescriptions People Consultation

Comlicated prescriptions people

Myopia Control Consultation

Myopia Control

Contacts are designed to correct nearsightedness (myopia) and far or long-sightedness (hyperopia). They can also be worn by people with astigmatism, presbyopia, and other vision disorders. The best contact lenses for you will do more than just improve vision. They can have added benefits, including myopia control, UV exposure protection, and dry eyes prevention.

Note, however, that they are not used to correct eye misalignment or heterophoria. Instead, spectacle lenses are more appropriate.

Soft or Hard Lenses: Which is Better for You?

They can be either soft or hard. What’s the difference and which type should you wear?

SOFT CONTACT LENSES

Soft Contact Lenses

Soft contact lenses have different modalities, referring to when they should be replaced. Some are only for one-time use called dailies; others are replaced every 2 weeks or one month. Specific contacts need customisation due to the complexity or uniqueness of the prescription. They are typically replaced every 12 months to the more commonly known “disposable” options. Hybrid lenses are a combined form of hard and soft lenses with a rigid centre. You’ll benefit from this type of soft contact lenses if you have high levels of astigmatism.

HARD CONTACT LENSES

Hard Contact Lenses

“Hard” contact lenses are usually designed for people with complicated and higher prescriptions for astigmatism, short, or long-sightedness. Also known as rigid gas permeable (RGP), hard contact lenses are more suited for people with keratoconus and other eye structure disorders that may require corneal surgeries. Contact lens consultations for custom lenses include taking more sophisticated measurements and more professional involvement by the optometrist to ensure the lenses are perfectly fitted. Like custom soft lenses, they are typically replaced every 12 months.

A lesser-known contact lens correction is OrthoKeratology – they’re worn overnight so that you can wake up to clear vision without wearing anything during the day. OrthoKeratology reshapes the cornea overnight without surgery. This correction is a myopia management strategy (myopia control), and can also be really helpful for contact induced dryness, as well as for water sports.

E Eye Place optometrists will guide you in determining the best contact lenses for your needs and prescription.

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Talk to us. We’re here to help you find the best contact lenses.

Cleaning Your Contact Lenses

Checking for myopia is not the same as your regular eye check-ups. It involves several procedures to determine how the eyes focus, along with determining how much power of lenses is required to correct blurry vision.

They’re your best contact lenses, just like eyeglasses, they require a little bit of TLC. Our friendly optometrists will give you useful advice on how to properly clean, care, and maintain your contacts. Cleaning is essential. You’re putting the lenses directly on your eye, and they typically stay there for hours. You want to make sure these contacts are sanitary by cleaning them before and after wearing them. The obvious yet often forgotten step is to wash and dry your hands thoroughly. Use soap and water to ensure your hands are clean before wearing contacts. And don’t forget to make sure your hands are completely dry.

Cleaning Your Contact Lenses

You need an appropriate contact lens solution to soak and rinse the lenses. Never use tap water or anything else other than a contact lens solution provided or recommended to you. It’s also what you’ll use to clean your contact lens case. Be careful with the solution by ensuring you don’t touch the top of its container to avoid contamination or leave the cap on unhygienic surfaces. As for your contact lens case, it’s recommended to replace it regularly, such as every 1 to 3 months, and earlier if it visibly looks dirty.

Best Practices for Wearing Contact Lenses

They are largely safe, with adverse events predominantly attributable to hygiene practices. Here are some tips for safe and comfortable contact lens use:

Avoid non-sterile water exposure.

 

Contacts and all contact lens accessories (including cases or applicators) should not be exposed to non-sterile water, including tap-water. This is why you should always dry your hands thoroughly before handling contact lenses, avoid showering while wearing them, and avoid swimming while wearing them (unless you have water-tight goggles). One of the most devastating eye infections, Acanthamoeba Keratitis, is caused by exposure to non-sterile water. Acanthamoeba Keratitis is tricky to diagnose, hard to treat, and can cause severe damage.

Don’t hang on to old contact lens cases.

 

One of the main reasons why contacts can become contaminated with microorganisms is from contact lens cases. Wash them after each use with contact lens solution, air dry them face down on a sterile towel/cloth/tissue, and replace them regularly (generally every 1-3 months).

Never wear them 24/7

 

Some people forget that they are wearing anything, so they may unintentionally fall asleep while wearing them. Overnight wear of contacts is also one of the important risk factors to cause infection, so you should always remove them before going to bed. In the case of prescribed overnight wear, there are additional precautions we advise to minimize your risk. Experts also agree that most wearers should avoid wearing contacts for more than 8-12 hours, and it is always ideal to give your eyes a break from contact lenses when you can.

While wearing contact lenses

 

If discomfort or irritation occurs, avoid rubbing your eyes or touching your eyes with dirty fingers, especially while wearing the lenses. Remove them immediately and replace them with your eyeglasses.

To avoid irritation

 

It’s best to check the expiry of the items you use, such as your contact lens solution.

It's not ideal to wear them when you have a bad cold or fever

 

Please discuss with your doctor whether you should continue wearing your contacts or replace them with new ones, particularly with lenses with a monthly or annual lifespan.

When outdoors on a hot, sunny day, wear sunglasses with a UV filter

 

This applies even to those who wear contacts that come with UV protection.

First in, first out

 

For contact lens wearers who use makeup, insert contact lenses in FIRST before applying makeup or facial products and avoid going too close to the lash line as products can seep into the eye, causing irritation or introduce unwanted contaminants. At the end of the day, remove contact lenses FIRST before removing makeup. Also, to be hygienic, ensure that your makeup products are replaced regularly.

See right, look right, feel right

 

If you notice vision changes, eye redness, and persistent discomfort, remove your contact lenses and make sure you talk to your optometrist right away for further advice.

Contacts and all contact lens accessories (including cases or applicators) should not be exposed to non-sterile water, including tap-water. This is why you should always dry your hands thoroughly before handling contacts, avoid showering and swimming while you have them on (unless you have water-tight goggles). One of the most devastating eye infections, Acanthamoeba Keratitis, is caused by exposure to non-sterile water. Acanthamoeba Keratitis is tricky to diagnose, hard to treat, and can cause severe damage.

One of the main reasons why contact lenses can become contaminated with microorganisms is from contact lens cases. Wash them after each use with contact lensasolution, air dry them face down on a sterile towel/cloth/tissue, and replace them regularly (generally every 1-3 months).

Some people forget that they are wearing contact lenses, so they may unintentionally fall asleep while wearing them. Overnight wear of contact lenses is also one of the important risk factors in contact lens related infection, so you should always remove them before going to bed. In the case of prescribed overnight wear, there are additional precautions we advise to minimize your risk. Experts also agree that most wearers should avoid wearing contact lenses for more than 8-12 hours, and it is always ideal to give your eyes a break from contact lenses when you can.

If discomfort or irritation occurs, avoid rubbing your eyes or touching your eyes with dirty fingers, especially while wearing the lenses. Remove them immediately and replace them with your eyeglasses.

It’s best to check the expiry of the items you use, such as your contact lens solution.

Please discuss with your doctor whether you should continue wearing your contacts or replace them with new ones, particularly with lenses with a monthly or annual lifespan.

This applies even to those who wear contacts that come with UV protection.

For contact lens wearers who use makeup, insert contact lenses in FIRST before applying makeup or facial products and avoid going too close to the lash line as products can seep into the eye, causing irritation or introduce unwanted contaminants. At the end of the day, remove contact lenses FIRST before removing makeup. Also, to be hygienic, ensure that your makeup products are replaced regularly.

If you notice vision changes, eye redness, and persistent discomfort, remove your contact lenses and make sure you talk to your optometrist right away for further advice.

Should You Worry about Dry Eyes or Eye Strain with Contact Lenses?

Should You Worry about Dry Eyes or Eye Strain with Contact Lenses?

One of the most common complaint of contact lens wearers is dry eyes. Often a simple solution is to use contact lens dry eye drops, but be careful in what you use. Your eye doctor will tell you the most suitable solution – it can be changing the type of contacts, contact lens solution, or advising appropriate eye drops. Eye strain can also be experienced when the prescription is not optimal, such as multifocal contact lenses, high astigmatism or undetected binocular vision problems. This is why a thorough contact lens consultation is required to ensure you will be prescribed the best contact lenses for your circumstances.

At E Eye Place, we make sure that you understand everything about them, including wearing and sanitising them properly. We will also help you choose the best eye drops to combat dry eyes and eye strain.

Frequently Asked Questions

They are generally for everyone, including young (but responsible) kids and teens. If you wear prescription glasses, you will find that they work well with them, especially if you have an active lifestyle. Wearing glasses can make certain activities difficult, such as during sports. This is where they become an excellent alternative. You can switch between your glasses and contacts when playing sports or going on holiday trips.

Some people want to retain their natural look, but eyeglasses can hinder that goal. Contacts easily solve this predicament. If you have a complicated prescription, you will benefit more from contacts since they offer an unhindered field of view and less distortion.

Contacts can be worn by people who are nearsighted, as well as those who are farsighted. E Eye Place can provide you with some to correct your vision, whether you have myopia or hyperopia.
If you have presbyopia, which restricts your eyes’ ability to focus on close objects, contacts are a great option to see better. Astigmatism can also be corrected by specific contacts.

They can also help correct several vision disorders. However, they do not possess the ability to correct misalignment of one eye or associated heterophoria. Talk to your eye doctor to assess your vision and determine the best lenses for you.

They can be either soft or hard. Soft contacts are those that need frequent replacement, such as daily, biweekly, and monthly. There are also soft variations called extended wear, which allow the user to wear them for up to 30 days without removal. Soft contacts can also be customised for a yearly replacement, commonly designed for people with high or complex prescriptions.

Meanwhile, hard contacts can also come in different types. The most popular are rigid eye permeable and minisclerals. They are suitable for those with high prescriptions, including those with astigmatism and myopia. Hard contacts are measured and fitted to the eyes of the wearer. They can be used for up to 18 months.

Cleanliness is the top priority. Dirty hands mean dirty lenses, which cause irritation or, worse, injury to the eyes. Always wash your hands with soap and water. Before picking up your contacts and inserting them on your eyes, dry your hands thoroughly.

Don’t be tempted to use tap water. Instead, use a saline solution for rinsing your contacts. A cleaning solution is used to clean the lenses and the case where you store them. Your contacts case should be replaced once a month.

Make sure you visit your eye doctor for routine check-ups, which help discern when you need a replacement or a prescription change.